Events

News

FAQ's
Fringe Games - Christchurch, New Zealand
Host City

Media

Search


Events: Athletic: Freestyle Ball Throw



Freestyle Ball Throw

This field event will be of great interest to baseball and cricket players and their millions of fans all over the world. By concentrating only on the throwing prowess involved in these sports, and confining the thrower to a 7ft diameter circle and a throwing sector, the ball throw becomes a legitimate athletic event, much like the shot put, but with a far larger pool of potential competitors and followers.

Unlike team sports, which involve expertise in a number of skills (like running, hitting, throwing, catching, and pitching), track and field events tend to focus on just one specific activity and build that up to a very high level of proficiency. For this reason, the ball throw is likely to benefit baseball and cricket because, by treating it as an athletic event and applying a greater degree of concentration to this one area, more advanced ball throwing techniques and training methods will be developed which can then be passed back to those sports. For example, the Gorbous drill, a special training technique developed for baseball throwing named after the Canadian baseball distance record holder, Glen Gorbous, involves throwing the ball straight up in the air as a way of developing the muscles involved in distance throwing. His 1957 record of 445 feet 10 inches still stands.

Throwing techniques will vary but it is expected that most throwers will start with their backs to the target and spin on the back foot to give added acceleration from the trunk prior to release. At the same time as the weight is transferred to the front foot, the rear throwing arm will come through at the shoulder which is tilted back to achieve the desired degree of loft. Being able to accurately judge the loft of the ball will gain valuable distance for the thrower. The ball must land in a designated strip of raked sand so that the throw can be correctly measured. The width of this strip will ensure accuracy of throw is maintained as a ball falling outside it will not count. The weight and size of the ball chosen for the event is likely to be closer to that of a baseball rather than a cricket ball which, being slightly heavier and smaller, will fly further than a baseball and not be so easily accommodated on sports grounds. (Cricket balls are approximately 156g and 22.5cm in circumference while baseballs are approximately 148g and 23cm in circumference.) Ball and strip dimensions will be posted soon.


Home  Top  Previous  Next

Events

News

FAQ's
Fringe Games - Christchurch, New Zealand
Host City

Media

Search

 Copyright © 1999 Fringe Games Promotions Ltd
 Updated 29 January 1999
 Kennett Bros Web Design